Greener Journal of Educational Research

Vol. 9(1), pp. 45-53, 2019

ISSN: 2276-7789††††††††††

Copyright ©2019, the copyright of this article is retained by the author(s)

DOI Link: http://doi.org/10.15580/GJER.2019.1.051619090

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Relationship between Principalsí Administrative Variables and Teachersí Job Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States of Nigeria

 

 

Oroye, Okpoudhu RachaelZino (Ph.D)

 

 

Adeje Secondary School Adeje, Okpe Local Government Area, Delta State, Nigeria

 

 

 

ARTICLE INFO

ABSTRACT

 

Article No.: 051619090

Type: Research

DOI: 10.15580/GJER.2019.1.051619090

 

This study investigated relationship between principalsí administrative variables and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo states of Nigeria. Three research questions were answered and three null hypotheses were tested at 0.05 level of significant. The study utilised ex-post facto design. The population of the study was 20,040 principals and teachers in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. The population includes 463 principals and 11,965 teachers in public secondary schools in Delta State and 259 principals and 7353 teachers in public secondary schools in Edo State. The researcher sampled 1,255 principals and teachers in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. The sample of Delta state public secondary schools was 185 principals and 598 teachers while the sample for Edo States public secondary schools was 104 principals and 368 teachers. The instrument was validated and found reliable. Multiple Regression Statistics Model was used to answer the three research questions and tested the three null hypotheses at 0.05 levels of confidence. Findings showed that there was significant relationship between administrative variables such as teachersí job security, decisions making and school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. It was concluded that administrative variables such as teachersí appraisal, teacherís job security, decision making and, school climate positively relate with teachersí job performance public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States as their mean ratings were high. The administrative variables such as teachersí job security, decision making and school climate do not significantly relate with teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. It was recommended in the study that Delta and Edo States governments should try to ensure that teacherís job security is taken seriously to make teachers more committed to their job.

 

Submitted: 16/05/2019

Accepted:29/05/2019

Published: 31/05/2019

 

*Corresponding Author

Oroye Zino

E-mail: Zinooroye@ gmail.com

Phone: 07014058990

 

Keywords: Administrative Variables of Principals, Correlate, Teachersí Job Performance Public Secondary Schools.

 

 

 

 

 


INTRODUCTION

 

School organisations may be defined in a variety of ways reflecting the function it performs, the market it serves and the product it produces. Organisations need competent administrators in order to reach their objectives, effectively and efficiently. The traditional part of the administratorís functions is to ensure that work is done well according to standard. In todayís horizontal organisation, administrators have functions and tasks that are highly interdependent. Administration is a highly individualised art. What style works well for one administrator in a particular situation may not produce the desired results for another administrator in a similar situation, or even for the same administrator in all situations. Every administrator must discover for himself, therefore, what works and what does not work for him in different situations. He cannot become effective merely by adopting the practices or the administrative styles of someone else. He must develop his own natural style and follow practices that are consistent with his own personality. According to Nnabuo (2001) educational administrators have administrative functions and responsibilities that are linked with purposes and processes of education that cannot be adequately or properly performed from the intrinsic educational activities of the organisation. Administration is the primary force within organisations for coordinating human and material resources, and administrators are responsible for organisational administrative, both current results and future potentials. School administration involves influence and it may be experienced by principals in schools. Traditionally, principalís job has been clearly focused on administration. The form of administration assumes that principals should be committed and capable of achieving stated goals of the schools.Higher levels of personal commitment to school goals and greater capacities for accomplishing those goals are assumed to result in extra and greater job performance. The principals perform with others to establish the vision in the structures and processes of the schools. They are responsible for teachersí job security, decision making processes, school climate, instructional supervision, input control, behaviour control, output control and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. The major focus of school administration is the behaviour of teachers as they engage in activities directly influencing the development of students. Instructional leadership model assumes that principals should have expert knowledge and formal authority to exert influence on teachers. School administrative assumes that the focus of principals ought to be on functions, task and behaviours. If these functionsí are carried out competently, the job of others in the schools will be facilitated. School administrative assumes as well assume that the behaviour of school members is largely rational. Authority and influence are allocated to the formal positions in proportion to the status of those positions in the school hierarchy. Southworth (2002) in a study found that that three strategies were particularly effective in improving teaching and learning. They are modeling, monitoring and professional dialogue and discussion. The principals should ensure concern for stated objectives, roles and the task of building purposes into its structure and exemplifying these purposes in everything that it does with followers. The embodiment of purpose and the development of followership are unavoidably ethical.†††††††

 

Statement of the Problem

 

The poor conditions of service in Delta and Edo states secondary schools are crippling the system as it is not encouraging teachers to stay in teaching profession.  Presently, there is insecurity in employment of teachers in Delta and Edo states. Delta and Edo states governments have review employment policies for teachers. The age long practice of tenured appointment is no longer in place. Many teachers in the public secondary schools are on federal government empowerment scheme which is on contract staffing basis. Delta and Edo states governments are not ready to give teachers permanent appointment.Teachers are extremely facing demotivating conditions of service due to insecurity and poor pay by Delta and Edo states governments. Contract staffing tied with lack of clear increase in salaries are some of the factors.

Decision making is central to principalís job of organising endeavour towards achieving goals and objectives. Many principals make incorrect decisions due to non involvement of their staff in decision making processes.Principals want teachers to be involved in decision making, but most times do not use their suggestions. Some principalís hoards information from their staff as well as set up kitchen cabinet. This involves the application of divide and rule in school administration. Some principals are extremely bureaucratic and create negative climate that encourage feelings of fear and change. They also create unfavourable school climate to learning, indisciplinary behaviour among staff and students and sabotage. They in addition provide school climate that sustain lack of esteem, competitiveness, threat, defensiveness and instructive approaches. Their administrative styles and inter-personal relationship with staff also negatively influence the climate of the schools.

 

Research Questions

†††††††††††

The following research questions were raised to guide study:

 

1.      What is the relationship between teachersí job security and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States?

2.      What is the relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States?

3.      What is the relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States?

 

Hypotheses

 

††††††††††† The following null hypotheses were formulated to guide the study:

 

1.      There is no significant relationship between teachersí job security and teacherís job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.

2.      There is no significant relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.

3.      There is no significant relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.

 

Purpose of the Study

 

This study investigated relationship between principalsí administrative variables and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States, Nigeria. Specifically the study investigated:

 

1.     The relationship between teachersí job security and teacherís job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.

2.     The relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.

3.†† The relationship between School climate and teachersí job performance in public ††††††††††† secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.

 

 

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

 

The Relationship between Teachersí Job Security and Teachersí Job Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States.

†††††††††††

Public secondary schools teachers in Delta and Edo States are continuously disturbed by job insecurity rate. The creative ability of a nation depends on a vibrant workforce (Money & Money, 2013). Rahim (2000) carried out a study on why teachers resist teams: Examining the 'Resistance Barrier, regards resistance and disagreement on the part of teachers assigned to teams. Findings showed that teachers' concerns reflected issues of school justice, such as fairness and equity; accountability; trust; school outlook; individual ability and influence. Foster (2013), confirmed that unmotivated teachers will not produce good results. Criticism, laxity, upset and fighting the principals will describe the level of their job performance. The principals will always be in the centre of blame. They will not get anything done without running into problems with their teachers.. Delta and Edo governments are responsible for ensuring teachersí job security.Ogboro and Adeyemi (2017) carried out a study on†† the levels of deployment, utilisation and job performance of teachers in the public senior secondary schools in Edo State.Findings showed that there is low deployment and uneven distribution of graduate teachers to public schools and under utilisation of these teachers were very clear. Consequently the study concluded that teachersí job performance and teachersí job security is very low and there was no rationalise distribution of teachers as there are inadequate teachers in rural area secondary schools.

 

The Relationship between Decision Making and Teachersí Job Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States.

 

           Dolinger and Danis (1998) carried out a study on preferred decision making styles: A cross cultural comparison. Findings showed that principals have a tendency to have more than three dominant style in decision making.   The Principal should be facilitators of learning to encourage teamwork among teachers and not instrument of political qualities.   Hall (2012) studied decision making in secondary schools. Findings showed that with regard to complex problem solving responsibilities, where there is a single correct answer based on objective facts or expert judgement, principals and teachers using an agreement method are more successful than decision made by principal alone, except in rare cases, averaging technique or voting. Bello, Ibi and Bukar (2016) carried out a study on principalsí administrative styles and studentsí academic performance in Taraba state secondary schools, Nigeria. Findings showed that there were no positive significant relationships between principals initiative administrative styles and studentsí academic performance. Findings further showed that no significant relationships between consideration structure of principalsí administrative styles, participatory administrative styles of principalsí and student academic performance in senior secondary schools. Findings also showed that among the three administrative styles, none is the best predictor of studentsí academic performance. Participative decision making boost teachers morale, motivation, job performance, reduces turnover and absenteeism rates.

 

The Relationship between School Climate and Teachersí Job Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States.

 

School climate is that uniqueness that differentiates secondary schools and relate with the behaviour of teachers in secondary schools. It is typically utilised to clarify the internal excellence of the schools as knowledgeable by its teachers. Climate is tone, 'personality', or nature of the school's environment, the entirety of the 'feel' of the schools that is viewed by the teachers as exclusive to schools. It is the term used to clarify psychological arrangement of schools. It is the broad mood that is expressed by the physical chart, the way teachers work together and the manner teachersí conduct themselves with students or other stranger. School climate is usually measured with instrument that is intended at measuring its basic extent. The physical, emotional and learning climate can be obviously different in each secondary school and thus can influence teachersí job performance.

The climate of a school particularly as established by the principal can support cooperation among individuals in the secondary schools or hinder it. Climate strength refers to the degree of agreement among members in the secondary schools about the importance of specific values. School climate serves two critical functions in the secondary schools. It integrates members so that they know how to relate to one another and assist the school get used to the external environment. If wide spread agreement exists about the importance of those values, the climate is organised and strong but if little agreement exists, the climate is weak. The climate of schools describes the uniqueness of a school. Review of literature shows the association between school climate and effective school administration and studentís academic performance. Positive school climate is very important in reducing inter-group conflict in secondary schools. The main challenge for principals is to know that school climate have relate with students, teachers and the type of behaviour utilised by them.Hayat (1998) conducted a study and focused on organisational climate, job satisfaction and classroom performance of college teachers. He found through his study that age, qualifications, staff size, length of service and stay in college were significantly correlated with job satisfaction of teachers in open and autonomous climates. Findings showed that open climate in bulk of colleges and college teachers with high scores on job satisfaction performed better in classroom. Tikunoff, Berliner and Rist (1995) in an ethnographic study of the forty classroom of the beginning teacher education evaluation study known sample. Findings showed that principalís and teachers involvement, hospitality, cooperation, engagement, promoting self sufficiency were climate that represent a warm , positive environment in which students and teachers share common suitable spirit and cooperation with each other.

Viltetoe (1997) studied the reasons for success and failure of first year teachers as judged by their principals. Findings showed that rapport with students, staff, parents, personality, knowledge of subject matters, personal attitude, enthusiasm, professional attitude and manner were the leading characteristics why first year teachers succeed or fail. Theory X administrative philosophy stressed that principals as administrator, provides school climate that support lack of esteem, competitiveness, threat, defensiveness and instructive approaches. The climate in a school duplicates the kind of people who make the schools, the job procedure, way of communication and principalís utilisation of power and authority. Oluremi (2008) studied principalís leadership behaviour and school learning climate in Ekiti state secondary schools. The researcher raised three questions and formulated three null hypotheses to lead the study. Findings showed principalís behaviour and school climate relate with teachersí job performance. Adejumobi and Ojikutu (2013) investigated the relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance among secondary schools in Lagos State. Findings revealed that there was a significant relationship among availability of facilities, class sise, leadership style, motivational strategies, teacher morale and teachersí job performance among secondary schools in Lagos State.

Hoy, Smith, & Sweetland (2002) identified some factors of school climate that relate to teachersí job performance as fringe benefits, salary, promotion, studentsí attitude, school location, administrative style, inter-personal associations, professional development, job security, student population, educational policy, and composition of students among others. School climate where the principals perform their jobs can lead to the accomplishment or breakdown of any school in terms of achievement of educational objective. It stands for all the basic features of the schools. They are the physical, social, academic and emotional aspects of the school. They may as well be influenced by material (external) or immaterial (internal) issues. External issues comprise site, sise, studentís population, government policies on educational and socio-economic alteration while internal issues comprise the interactive behaviours between educational administrators and principals, between principals and staff and between staff and students. The climate of schools describes the uniqueness of a school. Review of literature showed the association between school climate and effective school administration and studentís academic performance. Positive school climate is very important in reducing inter-group conflict in secondary schools. The main challenge for principals is to know that school climate have relate with students, teachers and the type of behaviour utilised by them. Okorji,Igbokwe andEseugbor (2016 ) carried out a study onrelationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in secondary schools in Enugu State, Nigeria. Findings showed there was a reasonable positive relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance. The school climate is mixture of the principalís performance and the teachersí performance (Kast & Rosenzwerg, 2002).

 

 

METHODOLOGY

 

The study utilised ex-post facto design.Ex-post facto research design is an organized observed investigation in which the researcher does not have direct control of the independent variables as their manifestations have previously happened, because they cannot be manipulated since they occur in a natural setting. It allows the researcher to show the relationship between the variables in his study and state the extent to which one variable affects the other. Ex-post facto design was employed as the study sought to ascertain the way and extent of the relationship between administrative variables of appraisal, job security, decision making and school climateand teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. The population of the study was 20,040 principals and teachers in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. The population includes 463 principals and 11,965 teachers in public secondary schools in Delta State and 259 principals and 7353 teachers in public secondary schools in Edo State. ††††††††††† The researcher sampled 1,255 principals and teachers in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. The sample of Delta state public secondary schools was 185 principals and 598 teachers while the sample for Edo States public secondary schools was 104 principals and 368 teachers. The stratified random sampling technique was utilised to select 40 % of principals and 5 % of teachers in the two states that were employed in the study. The research instrument for the study was a questionnaire titled Relationship between Principalsí Administrative Variables and Teachersí Job Performance Questionnaire (RPAVTJPQ). The instrument was developed by the researcher. Part A of the instrument consists of 16 items expected to gather data on the relationship between teachersí appraisal and teachersí job performance†† in public secondary schools. Part B of the instrument as well comprises 16 items on the relationship between teachersí job security and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. Part C of the instrument have16 items on the relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.The instrument was validated with expertís judgement To guarantee the internal consistency of the instrument, the researcher used split-half method to test the reliability of the instrument with piloting. The internal consistency of the various parts of the Relationship between Principalsí Administrative Variables and Teachersí Job Performance Questionnaire (RPAVTJPQ)was established.

The reliability coefficient of the parts was teachersí job security (0.74); Decision making (0.57); school climate (0.81) and an overall part alpha of 0.71 was also obtained. The researcher with the help of trained research assistants in the administration of the instrument visited the different schools utilised in the study to administer the instrument to principals and teachers who were used as respondents and directed them on how the questionnaire were filled.Items on the instrument based on variables such as teachersí job security, decision making and school climate were scored with the four points scoring scale of Strongly Agree (4 points), Agree (3 points), Disagree (2 points) and Strongly Disagree (1 point. Multiple Regression Statistics Model was used to answer the three research questions and†† test the three null hypotheses formulated to lead the study at 0.05 levels of confidence.

 

Research Question 1: What is the relationship between teachersí job security and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States?

 

Table 1: Multiple Regression Statistics Model on Relationship between Teachers Job Security by Principal and Teachersí Job Performance.

 

States

N

Mean

SD

R

Delta State

776

52.20

6.15

.032

Edo State

460

51.65

6.29

Delta and Edo States

1236

52.10

6.21

 

Data in Table 1 shows the descriptive statistics and relationship between teachersí jo security and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. Delta State has a mean score of 52.20, SD=6.15 while Edo State has mean score of 51.65, SD=6.29. When Delta and Edo States were combined together the mean score was 52.10, SD=6.21. The computed r value is .032. The r value of .032 suggested that there was a weak relationship between teachersí job security and teachersí job performance.

 

Research Question 2: What is the relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States?

 

Table 2: Multiple Regression Statistics Model on Relationship between Decision Making by Principal and Teachersí Job Performance.

States

N

Mean

SD

r

Delta State

776

50.79

6.91

.046

Edo State

460

49.99

6.84

Delta and Edo States

1236

50.49

6.89

 

Data in Table 2 shows the descriptive statistics and relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. Delta State has a mean score of 50.79, SD=6.91 while Edo State has mean score of 49.99, SD=6.84. When Delta and Edo States were combined together the mean score was 50.49, SD=6.89. The computed r value is .046. The r value of .046 suggested that there was a weak relationship between decisions making and teachersí job performance.

 

Research Question 3: What is the relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States?

 

Table 3: Multiple Regression Statistics Model on Relationship between School Climate by Principal and Teachersí Job Performance.

States

N

Mean

SD

r

Delta State

776

59.61

6.58

.257

Edo State

460

59.61

7.53

Delta and Edo States

1236

59.61

6.94

 

Data in Table 3 shows the descriptive statistics and relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. Delta State has a mean score of 59.61, SD=6.58 while Edo State has mean score of 59.61, SD=7.53. When Delta and Edo States were combined together the mean score was 59.61, SD=6.94. The computed r value is .257. The r value of .257 suggested that there was a weak relationship between school climates and teachersí job performance.

 

Hypothesis 1: There is no significant relationship between teachersí job security and teacherís job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.

 


 

Table 4 : Multiple Regression Statistics Model on Relationship between Teachersí Job Security and Teachersí Job Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States.

Sources

Sum of squares

DF

Mean of squares

F

P

Regression

9740.568

4

2435.142

50.699

.000

Residual

59126.691

1231

48.031

 

 

Total

68867.259

1235

 

 

 

P<.05 Level of Significance

†††††††††††


Data in Table 4shows regression analysis of the relationship between teachers job security and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. The computed regression analysis of variance (ANOVA) produced an F value of 50.699, df=(4,1231), P>.05 level of significance. Thus, the null hypothesis which states that there is no significant relationship between teachersí job security and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States was retained.

 

Hypothesis 2: There is no significant relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.


 

Table 5: Multiple Regression Statistics Model on Relationship between Decision Making and Teachersí Job Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States.

 

Sources

Sum of squares

DF

Mean of squares

F

P

Regression

9707.837

4

2426.959

50.501

.000

Residual

59159.422

1231

48.058

 

 

Total

68867.259

1235

 

 

 

P<.05 Level of Significance

†††††††††††


Data in Table 5 shows regression analysis of the relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. The computed regression analysis of variance (ANOVA) produced an F value of 50.501, df=(4,1231), P>.05 level of significance. Thus, the null hypothesis which states that there is no significant relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States was retained.

Hypothesis 3: There is no significant relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.


 

Table 6: Multiple Regression Statistics Model on Relationship between School Climate and Teachersí Job Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States.

 

Sources

Sum of squares

DF

Mean of squares

F

P

Regression

14391.282

4

3597.821

81.300

.000

Residual

54475.976

1231

44.253

 

 

Total

68867.259

1235

 

 

 

P<.05 Level of Significance

†††††††††††


Data in Table 6 shows regression analysis of the relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. The computed regression analysis of variance (ANOVA) produced an F value of 81.300, df=(4,1231), P>.05 level of significance. Thus, the null hypothesis which states that there is no significant relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States was retained.

 

 

DISCUSSION OF RESULTS.

 

Relationship Between Teacherís Job Security and Teacherís Job Performance†† in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States

 

Data in Table 4 shows the descriptive statistics and relationship between teachersí jo security and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. Delta State has a mean score of 52.20, SD=6.15 while Edo State has mean score of 51.65, SD=6.29. When Delta and Edo States were combined together the mean score was 52.10, SD=6.21. The computed r value is .032. The r value of .032 suggested that there was a weak relationship between teachersí job security and teachersí job performance.

There is no significant relationship between teachersí job security andteacherís job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. This finding could be that teachers job security do not lie in the hands of the principal rather in the hand of the government who employed the teachers. Thus to retain their job, teachers are committed to their job. This finding is also in line with Foster (2013), who confirmed that unmotivated teachers will not produce good results. Criticism, laxity, upset and fighting the principals will describe the level of their job performance. The principals will always be in the centre of blame. They will not get anything done without running into problems with their teachers.

This finding is not in agreement with the finding ofOgboro and Adeyemi (2017) in astudy on†† the levels of deployment, utilisation and job performance of teachers in the public senior secondary schools in Edo State thatthere is low deployment and uneven distribution of graduate teachers to public schools and under utilisation of these teachers were very clear. Consequently, the study concluded that teachersí job performance is very low and there was no rationalise distribution of teachers as there are inadequate teachers in rural area secondary schools.

 

The Relationship Between Decision Making by Principals and Teacherís Job Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States

 

 

Data in Table 5 shows the descriptive statistics and relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. Delta State has a mean score of 50.79, SD=6.91 while Edo State has mean score of 49.99, SD=6.84. When Delta and Edo States were combined together the mean score was 50.49, SD=6.89. The computed r value is .046. The r value of .046 suggested that there was a weak relationship between decisions making and teachersí job performance.

††††††††††† There is no significant relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. This hypothesis tested indicted that there is no significant relationship between decision making and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. This finding is as a result of the fact that principal do not take decision on their own, teachers are most likely to be involve in the decision making which will improve their job performance. This finding concurs with Duncan, Lafrance and Ginter (2003) who carried out a study on administrative and decision making: A retrospective application and assessment. Finding showed that decision making process that involves making the correct strategic choices leads to successful decision in secondary schools. But there are a lot of problems of principals making incorrect decisions.

This finding is not in line with the finding of Dolinger and Danis (1998) that principals have a tendency to have more than one dominant style in decision making. Principals should maintain an environment that supports teachersí efforts and minimise factors that can have negative influence in the learning process. This finding is not also in agreement with the finding of Hall (2012) carried out a study on decision making in secondary schools that with regard to complex problem solving responsibilities where there is a single, correct answer based on objective facts or expert judgement , principals and teachersusing an agreement method are more successful thandecision made byprincipal alone , except in rare cases , averaging technique or voting.

 

Relationship between School Climate and Teacherís Job Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States.

 

Data in Table 6shows the descriptive statistics and relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. Delta State has a mean score of 59.61, SD=6.58 while Edo State has mean score of 59.61, SD=7.53. When Delta and Edo States were combined together the mean score was 59.61, SD=6.94. The computed r value is .257. The r value of .257 suggested that there was a weak relationship between school climates and teachersí job performance.

There is no relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. The hypothesis tested revealed that there is no significant relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States. This findings is as a result that itis not only the school principal that will create positive school climate in the school. Thus, teachers strive to make the school climate conducive for them to perform their job.

This findings as well supports the findings of Costa (2011) that teachersí job performance is a major thing in competent class administration. This also support Adejumobi and Ojikutu (2013) who investigated the relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance among secondary schools in Lagos State and revealed that there was a significant relationship among availability of facilities, class sise, leadership style, motivational strategies, teacher morale and teachersí job performance among secondary schools in Lagos State.

This finding is not in corresponds with the finding of Abaya (2011) that principals had to among others should maintain high levels of competence, climate, professionalism as well as morals. This finding is not also in corresponds with the finding of Okorji, Igbokwe and Eseugbor (2016) that there was a reasonable positive relationship between school climate and principalís job performance.

 

 

FINDINGS.

 

From the data analysis, the followings findings were arrived at;

1         The administrative variable such as teachersí job security , decisions making and school climate relate with teachersí job performance positively in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States.

 

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Based on the findings, it was concluded that:

 

1.      The administrative variables such as teachersí appraisal, teacherís job security, ††† decision making, school climate positively relate with teachersí job performance†††† public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States as their mean ratings were high

2.      The administrative variables such as teachersí job security, decision making and schoolclimate do not significantly relate with teachersí job performance in public secondary schools in Delta and Edo States .

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS.

 

Arising from the findings, the following recommendations were made:

 

1.      Delta and Edo States governments should try to ensure that teacherís job security is taken seriously to make teachers more committed to their job.

2.      The principals should encourage commendable participation of teachers in decision making processes in secondary schools. They should organise periodic meetings with teachers to discuss problems they encounter in teaching.

3.      The principals should create conducive climate that will motivate teachersí in their job performance. They should utilse joint and friendly style of administration where teachers are involved and free to share ideas and concepts for administrative and school competency. They should as well create atmosphere that is supportive, simple, enjoyable, imaginative, and stress-free to motivate studentsí better involvement in learning and attaining educational goals.

4.      The Post Primary Education Board and the Ministry of Education should include a course on administrative variables of principalsí preparation programmes. They should also organise workshops for principals when appropriate to enable them acquire or improve their administrative skills and competency.

 

 

REFERENCES.

 

Abaya, J. (2011). How Secondary School Principals Build Trust in Kenya Secondary Schools. St. Louis: The University of Missouri.

Adejumobi , I.T & Ojikutu, R.K (2013) Relationship between school climate and teachersí job performance among secondary schools in Lagos State. Journal of Educational Research www.resjournals.org/IJER, 1(2); 26-36, June 2013.

Bello, S. Bukar, I. & Ibi, M.,(2016). Supply and Utilisation of ICT Facilities for sustainable educational development in federal colleges of education in the North-East, Nigeria: Journal of contemporary education research, 2(6)19-34.

Costa, A.L (2011) Analysis of class instruction. Recent Research . Newsletter of Phi Delta Kappan 21(3), May and June, 3.

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Cite this Article: Oroye, ORZ (2019). Relationship between Principalsí Administrative Variables and Teachersí Job Performance in Public Secondary Schools in Delta and Edo States of Nigeria. Greener Journal of Educational Research, 9(1): 45-53, http://doi.org/10.15580/GJER.2019.1.051619090.