Greener Journal of Educational Research

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Greener Journal of Educational Research

Vol. 9(1), pp. 54-64, 2019

ISSN: 2276-7789

Copyright ©2019, the copyright of this article is retained by the author(s)

DOI Link: http://doi.org/10.15580/GJER.2019.1.052019093

http://gjournals.org/GJER

 

 

Relationship between Job Satisfaction and Teachers’ Retention in Public Secondary Schools in Anambra and Imo States, Nigeria

   

ASUZU, Lois Adamma (Ph.D)

  

Ekpan Basic Secondary School, Nigercat, Effurun, Delta State.

   

ARTICLE INFO

ABSTRACT

 

Article No.: 052019093

Type: Research

DOI: 10.15580/GJER.2019.1.052019093

 

 

This study was undertaken to investigate relationship between job satisfaction and teachers’ retention in public secondary schools in Anambra and Imo States, Nigeria. The study adopted ex-post facto design.  The population of the study was 19,887 principals and teachers in public secondary schools in Anambra and Imo States. The population was two hundred and fifty-four principals (254) and eight thousand and sixty eight teachers (8,068) in Anambra States and three hundred and nine (309) principals and eleven thousand two hundred and fifty six (11,256) teachers in public secondary schools in Imo State as at 2017. The researcher sampled 2,080 principals and teachers in public secondary schools in Anambra and Imo States. Multiple Regression and Correlational Statistics was used to answer the four research questions and test the four null hypotheses formulated in the study at 0.05 level of significance. Findings showed that job satisfaction relate linearly with teachers’ retention in public secondary schools in Anambra and Imo States. Years of experience, gender and location as moderating variables relate with teachers’ retention in public secondary schools in Anambra and Imo States. It was concluded that job satisfaction has a positive linear relationship with teachers’ retention in public secondary schools in Anambra and Imo States. Years of experience, gender and location as moderating variables positively relate with teachers’ retention in Public Secondary Schools in Anambra and Imo States.  It was recommended among others that there is need to retain existing teachers in the public secondary schools Anambra and Imo States by improving their working condition to improve their job satisfaction.

 

Submitted: 20/05/2019

Accepted:  29/05/2019

Published: 31/05/2019

 

*Corresponding Author

Asuzu, Adamma

E-mail: revdasuzu@ yahoo.com

Phone: 07067065984

 

Keywords:

Job Satisfaction, Public Secondary Schools, Relationship, Teachers’ Retention

 

 

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Cite this Article: Asuzu, LA (2019). Relationship between Job Satisfaction and Teachers’ Retention in Public Secondary Schools in Anambra and Imo States, Nigeria. Greener Journal of Educational Research, 9(1): 54-64, http://doi.org/10.15580/GJER.2019.1.052019093.


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