Greener Journal of Agricultural Sciences

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Damiyal et al

Greener Journal of Agricultural Sciences

Vol. 11(1), pp. 1-5, 2021

ISSN: 2276-7770

Copyright ©2021, the copyright of this article is retained by the author(s)

https://gjournals.org/GJAS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Postharvest Spoilage of Irish Potato: A Survey of Farmers’ Storage Practices in Mangu, Plateau State

 

 

*Damiyal, D.M1; Adebitan, S.A2; Idi, S3; Jibung, G.G4

 

 

1Horticultural Technology Department, Plateau State College of Agriculture, Garkawa,

2Crop Science and Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, Federal University, Ikole Campus, Ikole/Oye Ekiti, Ekiti State,

3Agricultural Economics and Extension Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Abubakar Tafawa  Balewa University, Bauchi,

4Agricultural Technology Department, Plateau State College of Agriculture, Garkawa.

 

 

 

ARTICLE INFO

ABSTRACT

 

Article No.: 100920118

TypeResearch

 

 

A survey was conducted among farmers in Mangu Local Government Area in 2006 on postharvest spoilage of potato (solanum tuberosum L.). Emphasis was on factors which predispose potato to spoilage and control measures adopted. Questionnaires (150) were randomly administered to individual farmers selected from six out of nine potato producing Districts in the study area. Properly filled and returned questionnaires were 145. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. Slightly over one third (36.55%) of the respondents did not destroy potato haulms before harvest while about two third of them (63.45%) destroyed the haulms one to three weeks earlier. Almost half of the respondents (45.66%) stored between 1-10 bags while 93.79% of the respondents stored Irish potato in a general store only 5.52% of them share the bedroom with potato. One respondent used pit (trenches) for potato storage. In order to reduce deterioration of potato tubers, 82.76% of the respondents frequently checked their produce under storage to remove infected tubers. Almost 9% sold their produce immediately after harvest to avoid spoilage in the store and 8.28% treat with chemicals. Regression analyses revealed that the time of harvesting after haulm destruction and type of storage structure used by the farmers have positive significant (P<0.05) effect on deterioration of Irish potato and number of bags stored also significantly (P<0.01) affect deterioration of the produce. The control measures applied by farmers have negative significant (P<0.05) effect on deterioration of the total produce. The implication of the result is that farmers can reduce deterioration of their crops by decreasing the quantity of bags stored in a place at a time and increasing the control measures adopted. Therefore, a store room should be built solely for storing Irish potato by farmers.

 

Accepted:  16/09/2020

Published: 22/01/2021

 

*Corresponding Author

Damiyal, D.M

E-mail: molchendamiyal@ yahoo.com

 

Keywords:

Irish Potato; Deterioration; Mangu

 

 

 

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REFERENCES

 

Beukema, H.P and Van Der Za’ag, D.E (1990) Introduction to Potato Production. Pudoc Wageningen. 208pp

 

Burton, W.G. (1989) The Potato. Third edition. Longman, London 742 pp.

 

Chapman, S.R and Carter, L.P (1996). Crop Production Principles and Practice. W.H. Freed\man and Company, San Francisco. 566 pp.

 

Hill, D.S. and Waller, J.M (1999). Pests and Diseases of Tropical Crops. Vol. 2. Filed Handbook Agricultural Series. Longman Group, U.K. 4th  edition. 432 pp.       

 

Ifenkwe, O.P (1980). National Accelerated Food Production Late Blight. Pp 30. Kormava, M. (1999). Food Demand Structures and Market Studies for International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan Mandate Crop. Kormava, P and Aiyedun, E. (eds). In:  Food Demand and Market Studies in Drier Savanna of Nigeria. Proceeding of a Stakeholder Workshop, Kaduna.   

 

Kochhar, S.L (1986). Tropical Crops. A Textbook of Economic Botany. Second edition Macmillan Publisher Ltd, London and Basingstoke 467 pp.     

 

Logan, C., Copeland, R.B and Little, G. (1975). Potato gangrene control by ultra low volume sprayers of thiabendazole. Annals of Applied Biology 80: 199-204.

 

MacDonald, I. and Low, J. (1984) Fruits and Vegetable. Evan Brother Ltd 137 pp.

 

Opeke, L.K (2006) Essentials of Crop Farming, Spectrum book limited Ibadan, Nigeria. 305 pp.

 

Sarkar, A. (2000). Modern Handbook of Agricultural Science PA-155 Loyal book Depot College Road Meerut. 150 pp.

 

Wigginton, M.J (1974). Effect of temperature, Oxygen tension and relative humidity on the wound healing process in the potato tuber. Potato Research 17:200-214.     

 

 

 

Cite this Article: Damiyal, DM; Adebitan, SA; Idi, S; Jibung, GG (2021). Postharvest Spoilage of Irish Potato: A Survey of Farmers’ Storage Practices in Mangu, Plateau State. Greener Journal of Agricultural Sciences 11(1): 1-5.

 


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